If your faith creates deep happiness in you, then I say, keep it. If they cause trouble, if the beliefs of others are different, consciousness can leave you with the choice of what you believe and what you let go. Many of our convictions, our concepts, our agreements were nourished to us as „truth“ when we were young, and we accepted them literally and completely. The beginning of the four chords is about how we were domesticated by our caregivers in a „dream“ of life. The only dream they gave us was the one they lived, which they received most often from their parents, etc. Thank you, Allan, for sharing your wisdom. I am honored that someone of your stature would take the time to read my article and clarify the importance of the agreements. As far as my convictions are concerned, these are my two main problems with Roman Catholics: I believe that we Christians should respect the Jewish people and their traditions more. After all, this is the faith in which our Lord Jesus Christ grew and celebrated. I also do not believe in celibacy (from my point of view, Jesus and the apostles were too busy traveling, learning and teaching to care for women or earthly joys), but I respect priests because by choosing celibacy, they choose to live like him.

Nor do I think the four agreements are the ultimate truth. I think these are ten oversimplified agreements. The solution, according to Ruiz, is the four agreements. Create our own new chords and accredit based on how this world really works. This creates a new reality in which we can live. This is where Ruiz`s four agreements come into play. I read this and I fully understand the points he was trying to make. It is a little more sustained when you read the voice of knowledge. We learn everything as we grow up, part of what we learn is not positive. Many of us had parents who were young or who had themselves been abused, and we learn their „faith habits“ habits and patterns as we learn to count, talk, read, etc. Before the age of three, we do not know anger. We repeat the actions of our facilitators and our authority persons as children to obtain love, comfort and emotional support from them.

We repeat their model because it makes them love and makes us grateful for their behavior. On the other hand, what we did could have been interpreted as „false“ and we could be punished. Perhaps this punishment was severe or unfair and gave us an emotional memory of pain and fear. The repetition of similar anxieties makes this reaction a „behavioural pattern. As a child who wants love, you will make more effort not to upset this janitor and probably repeat the action that the enemy punishment has provoked to „fix“ it. The result will be similar. These beliefs could begin as a fear when presented with emotional memories and repeated traumas, that fear eventually becomes anger, hostility, hatred, resentment, and that we learn to reactivate the proposition. Where did the love go? You can no longer learn these patterns. You can see what caused the emotion, change the way you perceive it and get another emotional reaction result for future episodes.